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By V. Seruk. Fordham University.

Body posture Sitting straight or slumped discount viagra 50 mg with amex, relaxed If the pharmacist is sitting slumped in and position or tense cheap viagra 50 mg mastercard, and/or with hands a chair, the patient may perceive that crossed over body may indicate there is a lack of interest on the part one’s desire to be a part of the of the practitioner to be present at the conversation or it may reflect feel- patient visit. In addition, the distance or than just continuing to give informa- space between you and the patient tion to the patient, it may be better to may indicate the balance between pause, and ask the patient a reflective respect for personal space and question such as, “What do you think being close enough to comfort- about starting these new medications? Typically, finding a place to sit where you are close enough to reach the patient but not touching the patient is a good distance. If your therefore you should avoid touching patient is moving around too much the patient in the future. Additionally, or acting restless, it may indicate ner- if your patient appears to be moving vousness or discontent. In addition, around too much, you can ask the touching a patient on the shoulder patient a question such as, “You seem may show empathy or go together to be pacing the room—what is on with making a point; however, some your mind? Eye contact If you keep glancing at your As computerized medical records are computer screen or your phone, it becoming more prevalent, if you are appears to the patient that you are reviewing and documenting informa- not interested in what he or she tion as the patient is speaking, it may is saying; however, maintaining make the patient feel as though you continuous eye contact may make are not actively listening. Addi- visit, you can start by telling your tionally, certain cultures consider patient that you will be documenting eye contact to be a sign of respect in the computerized medical record whereas others think it is more throughout the visit to prepare the respectful to not make direct eye patient. Therefore, you should take the patient is answering your ques- nonverbal cues from your patient tions, you should make eye contact to maintain the right amount of and document this information at a eye contact, understanding that a later time. It has been well documented in the medical field that effec- tive communication with patients leads to better diagnosis and treatment, as well as an improved provider–patient relationship. Although most of this research is related to 5 12 chapter 1 / the patient interview physician–patient communications, it can easily translate to communications between the pharmacist and the patient. This is because pharmaceutical care, like the care pro- vided by a physician, involves (1) curing a patient’s disease, (2) eliminating or reducing a patient’s symptoms, (3) arresting or slowing a disease process, and (4) preventing a disease or symptoms. Even though a pharmacist does not make disease diagnoses like 6 physicians do, a pharmacist must nonetheless evaluate the information obtained from the patient interview, including the possibility of certain diagnoses, to appropriately create an assessment and plan, which may include a referral to the patient’s physician or an emergency room for further evaluation. This is typically documented in the patient’s own words and is therefore quoted in the written or oral presentation. One way to deter- mine the patient’s chief complaint is by asking, “What brings you here today? In the case of no overt complaint, the chief complaint may be goal-oriented, such as “I am here to pick up my refills,” “I am here to discuss my labs,” or “My doctor told me to see you about my sugars. For example, a patient may come in complaining of “being out of his furosemide” and, upon evaluation, it may be determined that the patient is experiencing acute heart failure. This assessment and the subsequent plan will be discussed elsewhere in your documentation. History of Present Illness The history of present illness (hpI) is the story of the illness. The pharmacist will 7 further explore the chief complaint as well as any other potential problems by asking questions about any recent or remote history that may be related to the current illness. Seven attributes need to be addressed to obtain a well- characterized description of the complaint or symptom: location, quality, quantity or severity, timing, setting, factors that aggravate or relieve the symptoms, and associated manifestations. For example, if the patient much worse is it now than it is in pain, characterize the pain by using normally is? If “Would you say that this the symptom is pain, ask the patient to swelling is causing your leg to rate the pain on a scale of 1 to 10. Setting This includes addressing the possible “Have you noticed what cause of the symptom. Do you relieve the or nonpharmacologic therapies used to notice a difference in the symptom relieve the symptoms and their efficacy. Are you experienc- that may be a consequence of the primary ing any shortness of breath or symptom. For example, if a patient complains of a cough, it is not necessary to ask about the “location” of the cough. However, if a patient complains of a headache, specifying the exact “location” of the pain (i. A patient who is telling you parts of his or her story may not realize which parts are pertinent. For example, the patient may not know how and what information needs to be relayed to you so that you can make a complete assessment. It is like a puzzle in that you may know what the completed puzzle will look like; however, you have to pick up each piece; examine its shape and color for hints, such as having a flat side, which indicates that it is a border piece; and then place it near other “like” pieces until you are able to fit all the pieces together. You, as the pharmacist, should start thinking of various questions to ask the patient so that the patient’s responses, or the puzzle pieces, may be put together to ascertain or rule out certain assessments. In the case of the patient interview, you will be assessing each piece of information for its reliability, completeness, and relevance to the problem. You may need to assess a patient’s medical condition during the patient interview even if the patient does not have any complaints regarding that medical condition.

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For abdominal thrust in the standing discount viagra 75 mg overnight delivery, sitting or kneeling position the rescuer moves behind the child and passes his arms around the child’s body buy viagra 75mg low cost. One hand is formed into a fist and placed against the child’s abdomen above the umbilicus and below the xiphisternum. The other hand is placed over the fist and both hands are thrust sharply upwards into the abdomen towards the chest. In the lying (supine) position the rescuer kneels astride the victim and does the same manoeuvre except that the heel of one hand is used rather than a fist. If not relieved the cycle of back blows →abdominal thrusts →reassessment is repeated until the relief of obstruction or failure of resuscitation. Delirium is a sudden onset state of confusion in which there is impaired awareness and memory and disorientation. Delirium should not be mistaken for psychiatric disorders like schizophrenia or a manic phase of a bipolar disorder. These patients are mostly orientated for time, place and situation, can in a way make contact and co-operate within the evaluation and are of clear consciousness. The elderly are particularly prone to delirium caused by medication, infections, electrolyte and other metabolic disturbances. Main clinical features are: » acute onset (usually hours to days) » confusion » impaired awareness » disorientation Other symptoms may also be present: » restlessness and agitation » hallucinations » autonomic symptoms such as sweating, tachycardia and flushing » patients may be hypo-active, with reduced responsiveness to the environment » a fluctuating course and disturbances of the sleep-wake cycle are characteristic » aggressiveness » violent behaviour alone occurs in exceptional cases only 21. T – Trauma O – Oxygen deficit (including hypoxia, carbon monoxide poisoning) P – Psychiatric or physical conditions, e. Poisoning may occur by ingestion, inhalation or absorption through skin or mucus membranes. Frequently encountered poisons include: » analgesics » anti-epileptic agents » antidepressants and sedatives » pesticides » volatile hydrocarbons, e. Note: Healthcare workers and relatives should avoid having skin contact with the poison. Specific antidotes Hypoxia, especially in carbon monoxide poisoning:  Oxygen Organophosphate and carbamate poisoning » Signs and symptoms of organophosphate poisoning include:  diarrhoea  weakness  vomiting  miosis/mydriasis  bradycardia  confusion  muscle twitching  convulsions  coma  hypersecretions (hypersalivation, sweating,lacrimation, rhinorrhoea)  brochospasm and bronchorhoea, causing tightness in the chest, wheezing, cough and pulmonary oedema 21. Note: Send the following to hospital with the patient: » written information » a sample of the poison or the empty poison container 21. The definitions of sexual offences are within the Criminal Law (Sexual Offences and Related Matters) Amendment Act, No 32 of 2007. So called “cold cases” (> 72 hours after the incident) may be managed medically and given an appointment for medico-legal investigation. Medico-legal assessment of injuries » Complete appropriate required forms and registers. Adults  Tenofovir, oral, 300 mg daily for 4 weeks and  Emtricitabine, oral, 200 mg daily for 4 weeks or Lamivudine, oral, 150 mg 12 hourly for 4 weeks. If uncertain, phone Childline 0800055555 - Adults with: » Active bleeding » Multiple injuries » Abdominal pain » History of the use of a foreign object Note: Refer if there are inadequate resources with regard to: – counselling – medico-legal examination – laboratory for testing – medicine treatment 21. There is a higher risk when: » the injury is deep » involves a hollow needle » or when the source patient is more infectious, e. Other blood borne infections that can be transmitted include hepatitis B, hepatitis C and syphilis and all source patients should be tested. Adverse effects occur in about half of cases and therapy is discontinued in about a third. Tenofovir is contra-indicated in renal disease or with concomitant use of nephrotoxic medicines e. Clinical features include: » tremor » confusion » sweating » delirium » tachycardia » coma » dizziness » convulsions » hunger » transient aphasia or speech disorders » headache » irritability » impaired concentration There may be few or no symptoms in the following situations: » chronically low blood sugar » patients with impaired autonomic nervous system response, e. Breastfeeding child  administer breast milk Older children  A formula feed of 5 mL/kg. Conscious patient, not able to feed without danger of aspiration Administer via nasogastric tube:  Dextrose 10%, 5 mL/kg. Closed injuries and fractures of long bones may be serious and damage blood vessels. Note: In a fully immunised person, tetanus toxoid vaccine might produce an unpleasant reaction, e. Increased heart rate (> 160 beats/minute in infants, > 120 beats/minute in children). Decreased blood pressure and decreased urine output are late signs of shock and can be monitored. The other signs mentioned above are more sensitive in detecting shock, before irreversible. Types of shock Additional symptoms » Hypovolaemic shock  Most common type of shock Weak thready pulse, cold  Primary cause is loss of fluid and clammy skin. Intravenous fluid therapy is important in the treatment of all types of shock except for cardiogenic shock and septic shock after fluid challenge.

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